sendthewolves:

This panel from Black Widow: The Name of the Rose is my new favourite thing ever. Look at Natasha: JUST TENDING TO MY OWN WOUNDS AND DRINKING A CUP OF TEA IN FRONT OF MY BADASS GUN STASH, NO BIG DEAL.

sendthewolves:

This panel from Black Widow: The Name of the Rose is my new favourite thing ever. Look at Natasha: JUST TENDING TO MY OWN WOUNDS AND DRINKING A CUP OF TEA IN FRONT OF MY BADASS GUN STASH, NO BIG DEAL.

(via septembriseur)

Tags: Black Widow

emmatops said: Hi! I was wondering if you know what Rooskaya means?

fuckyeahblackwidow:

Rooskaya (русская) means Russian. It’s the feminine form of the adjective. When Yelena first confronts Natasha, she’s full of patriot identities:

My name is Yelena Belova. And I am a student from the Red Room in Moscow. You remember it, then? Yes, I thought you would. And yes, it is still active. You are its greatest legend, Natalia Romanova, even though you are no longer truly Russian.

Natasha calls Yelena rooskaya because Yelena says that Natasha is not.

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

rosescarletfairy:

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

superdames:

Yeah, women are worthy.

  • Jane Foster in What If? #10 (1978)
  • Storm in X-Men Annual #9 (1985)
  • Rogue in What If? #66 (1994)
  • Wonder Woman in DC Versus Marvel #3 (1996)
  • Black Widow in What If: Age of Ultron #3 (2014)

"I remember a Norwegina girl from Nursing School…"

There is a 100% probability that Jane Foster just totally named herself after one of her old lovers…

I accept this!

Canon queer Jane Foster is a thing that I desire with all my heart :D

Being a cutie

Getting romanced by Sif and being precious girlfriends with her…

(via iconuk01)

"One of the interesting things about Black Widow is that she’s one of the only members of the group without either superpowers or a technical marvel of a suit. She’s just herself, a kick-a** assassin. When asked if she would ever want to find a way to manufacture a kind of superpower, to join the team at that level, Johansson said that Widow’s devious mind is actually her greatest asset.

"Oh, man… I think her greatest attribute is that she’s — I don’t want to say she has a criminal mind, but she does in a way," Johansson said. "She’s a super spy. Her ability to understand the complexity of the criminal mind, she uses that to her advantage. She’s often the one that’s going, ‘Right, you think it’s this way, but if you think about it from this person’s perspective, this might be the answer.’ She’s always using her experience in her sordid past to her advantage. I don’t think there’s any super suit that could supersede that for her. I think what she lends to the team — she let’s everyone else play with their big toys. And she gets some pretty good toys too, especially in Avengers 2 — I can’t complain. [Laughs]"

"

Should Widow Have Superpowers? [x] (via djangomaximoff)

(Source: fyeahmcublackwidow, via djangomaximoff)

comicsriot:

Okay, it’s my turn to do one of those classic Tumblr posts where I reblog somebody else’s movie gifs and add a, “let’s talk about this scene, though.”

Let’s talk about this scene, though. This little exchange about the bikini is one of the moments that stuck with me the most from The Winter Soldier, in terms of characterizing Natasha, as well as Steve’s relationship with her.

So we learn that Natasha has a small but grisly-looking bullet scar on her abdomen. She points out that it keeps her from wearing a bikini.

What Steve hears her say is that she’s self-conscious about how she’d look in a bikini because of a scar. So his reaction is basically to say, “Whatever, girl. You still look great.” He’s not even flirting, he’s just saying, “That’s ridiculous.”

But he’s hearing her wrong. It’s not that Natasha doesn’t wear bikinis because she’s embarrassed by her scar, or self-conscious of its ugliness. Natasha doesn’t wear bikinis because she doesn’t want anyone around the pool or at the beach to know that she’s the sort of person who acquires bullet scars.

Think about it: Whether it’s an undercover mission or R&R, any situation where the Black Widow wears a swimsuit is going to be one in which she prefers everyone to see her as just some anonymous hot girl. Because if somebody else is around with the same training she has, they’re going to be scanning the area for anyone who looks dangerous. And part of Natasha’s job- part of what keeps Natasha alive- is not showing up on their radar.

I like to think that later Steve put this together, or she explained it to him. RIght now, though, they have more pressing concerns, like Steve’s one-armed ex-boyfriend who put the scar there in the first place.

(Source: forassgard, via septembriseur)

wrecked-anon:

There are only two rules in Avengers Tower that every Avenger follows:

  1. Do not fuck with Natasha while she is reading.
  2. Do not tell Natasha that her feet are cute. She can kill you with them.

Limited color palette #7 for the incomparable rngrn.

High-res here.

(via babeltwo)

Tags: Black Widow

fuckyeahblackwidow:


I was given a second chance. I was more than a butcher. But this is my house.Lobo: What are you doing?Natasha: Some housecleaning.Lobo: Ack!

I was talking some, somewhere else, about how Natasha thinks she’s a little bit above the rules, something that comes to play here in Black Widow #3. Natasha compares herself to Lobo here and decides that she is worth saving, and he isn’t. She tanks her mission last-minute because can’t be responsible for giving a butcher back his freedom and his knife drawer.
Natasha’s stories are full of ignoring Fury’s orders and doing things her own way, it is a common trope in spy fiction— fictional spies usually don’t have a slavish devotion to authority because their work requires them to operate outside the normal boundaries of society and morality. A good agent needs to be able to think outside the mission, and Natasha needs to know when the mission is not worth doing. I mean, she is an Avenger and a spy, which is kind of a contradiction in terms. Like I said: the rules don’t apply.
There is some criticism of the current volume and how often Natasha seems to get blindsided, how often her missions drift south and how she doesn’t have contingencies wrapped in contingencies. And I agree, to a certain point— I would like to see her win. I am biased. But Natasha isn’t a good agent because she can follow directions to the letter, she is the best agent because she knows when she shouldn’t. She has back up: safehouses, extraction plans. She never gets blown away.
From Black Widow #3, by Nathan Edmondson and Phil Noto.

fuckyeahblackwidow:

I was given a second chance. I was more than a butcher. But this is my house.
Lobo: What are you doing?
Natasha: Some housecleaning.
Lobo: Ack!

I was talking some, somewhere else, about how Natasha thinks she’s a little bit above the rules, something that comes to play here in Black Widow #3. Natasha compares herself to Lobo here and decides that she is worth saving, and he isn’t. She tanks her mission last-minute because can’t be responsible for giving a butcher back his freedom and his knife drawer.

Natasha’s stories are full of ignoring Fury’s orders and doing things her own way, it is a common trope in spy fiction— fictional spies usually don’t have a slavish devotion to authority because their work requires them to operate outside the normal boundaries of society and morality. A good agent needs to be able to think outside the mission, and Natasha needs to know when the mission is not worth doing. I mean, she is an Avenger and a spy, which is kind of a contradiction in terms. Like I said: the rules don’t apply.

There is some criticism of the current volume and how often Natasha seems to get blindsided, how often her missions drift south and how she doesn’t have contingencies wrapped in contingencies. And I agree, to a certain point— I would like to see her win. I am biased. But Natasha isn’t a good agent because she can follow directions to the letter, she is the best agent because she knows when she shouldn’t. She has back up: safehouses, extraction plans. She never gets blown away.

From Black Widow #3, by Nathan Edmondson and Phil Noto.

Make me choose:  ninaharvelle asked →Darcy/Jane or Pepper/Natasha?

(via latitans)

i-llbedammned:

As if anyone could really forget the most quoted line in “The Avengers” — “I’ve got red in my ledger; I’d like to wipe it out” — it helps to have that line fresh in your mind when deconstructing what Widow does in the final act of what’s billed as a Captain America movie. Black Widow doesn’t wipe out the red in her ledger. No, she blasts her ledger out to the world, like it was the grisliest email forward of all time. We know from her heart to heart with Hawkeye that the shame she feels about what she’s done is real, and she hesitates when she realizes that taking down the bad guys means revealing her secrets. But she does it anyway, because she’s not just a spy anymore; she’s a super hero, and she makes a super hero’s sacrifice. (x)

She’s not afraid to call out other people’s bluffs even if it means hurting herself in the process.  Even with Loki she let part of her past slip to him, allowed him to see at least part of the hurt that she was going through, just so that she could get him to pay for what he did.

Part of me thinks that is part of her coping mechanism.  She rarely reveals things to those closest to her, but she reveals them instead to the world or to hated enemies.  She knows no one will take them seriously and that they will never really be able to find her and talk about it.  They will launch accusations, but no questions.  The world will never ask how she’s feeling about her past, only view it purely based upon the facts.

(Source: wintersoldeirs)

queenclintasha:

Natasha + dancing

(via exitpursuedbyamormont)

Tags: Black Widow