"

As an intern for Marvel in the late 70’s, racist jokes were routinely, as in every day, thrown my way. By white intellectuals, By people who did not regard themselves as racist and did not regard their remarks as racist simply by virtue of the fact they were the ones making them. Marv Wolfman routinely had me making multiple xeroxes of Gene Colan’s gorgeous pencils for TOMB OF DRACULA, and, after a few passes, the pencil graphite would be all over my hands. Several staffers, some who are still in the Marvel offices today, would pick my hand up and show the graphite-covered hand to the bullpen while exclaiming, “Hey— your hands are black!” (Marv never did this, by the way. In fact, Marv rarely came out of his office. I started to think he WAS, in fact, Dracula).

I was the office mascot. The little black kid. The co-key operator for the Xerox machine (with John Romita, Jr., who enthusiastically relinquished the top slot to me). My how liberal we are. Jim, go grab this, “In a jig.” Staffers, some still in the biz, used to come by and rub my head “for good luck.” One staffer kept little jigaboo figurines on his desk: warped, offensive little gnomes in white face eating watermelon. Denys Cowan stole one off of this guy’s desk and gave it to me as a Christmas present. I keep it on my desk here to remind me some of these people still work there…

I didn’t know Larry Hama when he suddenly became my boss on CRAZY Magazine in 1980, but I had been warned that he was, indeed, the best man for the job because he was thoroughly nuts. “Two-Gun” Hama, as he was called behind his back, arrived at Marvel and, like Denzel Washington in Training Day, immediately went about turning my life upside down. Hama has had the most profound and lasting influence on my life, my sense of self, and my sense of honor and morality. He is the most important father figure in my life, and I am most grateful to God for the years we struggled together in that tiny office at Marvel.

The first thing Hama did was build himself a bunker. Steel flat files cases and a drawing easel were arranged in such a way that people passing by the office could see me but not him, and had to stop and deal with me before they dealt with him. He installed red gels in the overhead light grilles, which gave our office a hellish tint and made the mood even more off-putting and less inviting to the rubes. EPIC ILLUSTRATED’s Peter Ledger painted Larry’s office phone bright red and molded little icons all over it, and Larry played Jefferson Starship and The Ramones as he held court with the likes of Bobby London, Mary Wilshire, Heidi MacDonald, Shari Flannigan and other top artists from NATIONAL LAMPOON and other humor magazines.

First day on the job, Larry took me to lunch to explain the New Deal to me. Before his arrival, I had been paid twenty-five dollars a month (yes, a month) to be Paul Laiken’s assistant on CRAZY. Larry was incensed that Marvel had allowed this, and immediately gave me a raise to a whopping $400 per month, which, for a nineteen year-old, was a good deal. Larry later worked to get me on staff (I was, officially, a freelancer), and soon I was making an actual salary, with benefits and so forth.

At the restaurant, as we waited for an open table, a lovely blonde and her lunch companion stepped past us, and the host appeared and began to seat them. Hama objected, politely— we were here first, and the host quickly sat us instead. Hama sat at the table, removed his mirrored aviators, and said, “Jim— never let the white man take advantage of you.”

And, I guess, that’s when it hit me: Larry was Japanese American. A guy many people sidled up to and spoke loudly and slowly, hoping he could understand them. Larry was a Hollywood actor, having appeared in many films. His diction was perfect, and he spoke English better than I did, and in as many dialects as he wanted to.

Larry suddenly made my world make sense. Suddenly, somebody at Marvel had my back. Staffers were much less likely to rub my head or make the black-hands jokes once Larry arrived.

"

Christopher Priest (via assistedrealityinterface)

Christopher Priest is the greatest.

(via samuraifuckingfrog)

Absolutely fascinating stuff. What’s Priest up to these days anyway?

(via trull-the-inhuman)

No idea.  He had some health issues (a stroke) and some problems with neighbors that got weird.  I think he’s putting all his effort into being an actual Minister now.

His last post on his site was eight months ago.

http://lamerciepark.com/id13/130108/index2.html

(via hysanadu)

He stopped writing comics which really sucks but he had a really good reason for that.

(via wondygirl)

(Source: robbiebaldwin, via wondygirl)

open ended, whatever takes your interest!
Well then…
I think the points of big events at Marvel right now (and right NOW) is about prepping new status quos. And the thing is… most of those new status quo are pretty damn interesting and well done, actually; sometimes surprisngly so given how crap the actual events tend to be. Obviously that’s variable, A vs X was awful, Fear, Itself was extremely mediocre, but say, Siege was decent and House of M is merely extremely flawed but with good moments of intense drama.
It’s pretty sad given how average to terrible those events are that they are what ends up being extremely successful commercially :(
I think the formula they are progressively moving towards is good though. One mini with its own title; and ties in in other books which show the impact of the event on specific team while still retaining its own personality. I think it’s the best formula for that sort of thing all things considered and probably why ties in have been steadily much better quality than most of the events themselves lately.
What they still need is a good way to improve the quality of the actual main mini. Clearly Fraction isn’t very good for that XD (despite being good at the big crossover kind of event as evidenced by Second Coming?), and Bendis is too weak at plot as well as I guess. The whole alternating between writers is the most terrible of alternatives too. I’m curious to see how Hickman will fare. He can be a solid storyteller at times, but not so much and he can be VERY conceited too so I have no idea.
"‘Captain Marvel,’ ‘Journey Into Mystery’ and ‘Red She-Hulk’ are all selling between 20,000 and 23,000 copies a month. To put that in perspective, the company these three books were keeping on the November 2012 sales figures (‘Avengers Academy,’ ‘Age of Apocalypse,’ ‘Defenders’ and ‘X-Treme X-Men’) have all been cancelled. Comparing these sales figures to their DC counterparts is even more disheartening (as a Marvel fan who wants to see these books succeed, that is. It’s great for the industry!). ‘Batgirl’ comfortably sells 50,000 a month. ‘Catwoman’ and ‘Wonder Woman’ are just a little behind at 40,000. ‘Batwoman’ is leveling out in the mid-30,000 area. Objectively, I am pleased that DC has success with their female headliners. That’s a step in the right direction. I just want the same thing for Marvel."

CBR: Support Your Female Comic Leads by Brett White (via fuckyeahcaroldanvers)

(via fyeahlilbit3point0)

beckerbell:

demoiselledefortune replied to your postSomething I have never really been able to figure…

It confuses me too.

malaptica replied to your post: Something I have never really been able to figure…

this is usually the part where I cry and give up (I suppose I’d assume that the Shi’ar, Kree, and Skrull are in Midgard?)

The more I think about it, the more I suspect there are only two answers—at least that I can come up with.

1.  The Shi’ar, Kree, and Skrull are in Midgard and Asgard is like, eh, they’ll take care of their own shit.  Sort of like the Federal government saying the individual State governments will take care of their own shit.

This doesn’t really work for me because, if you don’t step in during some of the major shit we’ve seen going down, when WOULD you step in?

Unless Asgard isn’t really the steward of the Nine Realms anymore, they’re just Asgard now and only have the planet Earth as their protectorate and that’s more that… they just like they place and are on really friendly terms with them, because Earth doesn’t really specifically need them a lot of the time.

You’d think, though, that if the Shi’ar and the Kree and the Skrull were part of the Nine Realms, though, that Asgard would have had dealings with them and they’d be as much a part of the lore (in Marvel, obviously not in Norse mythology) as the Vanir or the dwarves or the elves.  Because aren’t those three races pretty damn ancient, too?

2.  The Nine Realms and wherever Kree/Skrull/Shi’ar space are are entirely separate.  Perhaps Midgard is at the far end of the Nine Realms and that’s as far as the Aesir bothered go to (since Midgard is supposed to be HUUUUUGE compared to the other Realms) and beyond that are where everyone else is?  That makes the most sense to me so far.

Given how established and powerful those races are, it’s not like the Aesir would have just ignored them or found them beneath notice.  If there’s no connection there, then I have to assume they don’t share space?

idk, I know the real answer is probably, “Marvel doesn’t care and neither should you.”  sigh.

Yeah, I think that works best is to think that only Earth is Midgard is part of the 9 Realms. “Regular” Space and Magic connections work in different ways.

Thor does deal with cosmic stuff too, though, from times to times, but it doesn’t seem to be part of whatever deal they have with the 9 Realms.

blackfolksmakingcomics:

comicsalliance:

Outrage Deferred: On The Lack Of Black Writers In The Comic Book Industry
By Joseph Hughes, Editor-in-Chief
This is the first week of Black History Month, a four week celebration and remembrance of the significant events and people of the African diaspora. For many, myself included, it’s a month to reflect on where we’ve been, as a people and as a nation, and to contemplate exactly where it is we’re going. In terms of the comic industry, an obvious interest and passion of mine, there is one glaring and sobering fact that needs our attention: There is currently not a single black writer working on a monthly series for either of the two biggest comic book publishers in the United States, and precious few working for any of the others.And yet, this fact has hardly been discussed recently, in the way some other diversity issues are. So what happened, exactly? Why is it that we no longer seem to care about this as much as we once did? Where has our outrage gone?Read more.

Please read this article.
And, as always, don’t read the comments because they may make you angry.

blackfolksmakingcomics:

comicsalliance:

Outrage Deferred: On The Lack Of Black Writers In The Comic Book Industry

By Joseph Hughes, Editor-in-Chief

This is the first week of Black History Month, a four week celebration and remembrance of the significant events and people of the African diaspora. For many, myself included, it’s a month to reflect on where we’ve been, as a people and as a nation, and to contemplate exactly where it is we’re going. In terms of the comic industry, an obvious interest and passion of mine, there is one glaring and sobering fact that needs our attention: There is currently not a single black writer working on a monthly series for either of the two biggest comic book publishers in the United States, and precious few working for any of the others.

And yet, this fact has hardly been discussed recently, in the way some other diversity issues are. So what happened, exactly? Why is it that we no longer seem to care about this as much as we once did? Where has our outrage gone?

Read more.

Please read this article.

And, as always, don’t read the comments because they may make you angry.

Avengers Origins: Luke Cage

(Source: withironhands, via fyeahlilbit3point0)

(Source: onion-kid)

thoughtnami:

Daken by Ken Lashley.

thoughtnami:

Daken by Ken Lashley.

(Source: ledkilla, via blackfolksmakingcomics)